Permit

Permit

PERMIT (Trachinotus Falcatus): Best described as, “Forked Tail Devil”. Other names have been used but I chose in good taste not to mention them if you know what I mean. Adjectives used to describe this species: skittish, spooky, elusive, nerve racking and down-right wrong. This is the fish that makes me tick. With it's sooty black dorsal fin and tail and slightly grayish- blue body you would think they would be easy to see, right? Well I wouldn't bet the farm on it. With an eye the size of a horse’s, they can see extremely well. More than once has a fish left the flats because of the start of a back cast, them seeing the fly line overhead, or even feeling the pressure of the boat. Tailing, or eating fish still make me weak in the knees and people tell me I get over-excited when they are tailing but this seems to be the most opportune time to hook into one. Accuracy is your biggest asset with these fish. You might be heard saying “Rob, calm down you're making me nervous.” although you'll be nervous enough without me telling you. The fight these fish produce is similar to a Bonefish in 1 way: blistering runs. After that it's them bulldogging you hoping to find something on the bottom to break you off on. Some fights have lasted up to 20 minutes and in the end you will have a photo and a memory that will last a lifetime because each permit is such a precious gift that can only happen when “all the stars have aligned”.

Bonefish

Bonefish

BONEFISH (Albula vulpes): This species is known to most as the “gray ghost” of the flats and for good reason. Sight fishing for bones is a great way to prepare yourself for a true flats adventure. This silvery gem of a fish can blend itself to the colors of it's surroundings so well that sometimes you don't spot the fish 'til it's too late. But most of the time I will give you ample time to get a cast off to the fish that will make blistering runs and take you into your backing faster than imaginable. Once the fish is in hand you will be amazed at the colors that are exhibited on the tips of their fin and tail. The only way that I can describe it is a blend of the most beautiful turquoise and vibrant sapphire known to man. This is not to take away from the rest of the fish's mirror-like scales that glisten like diamonds in the sunlight. The Bonefish is a true flats gem.

Tarpon

Tarpon

TARPON (Megalops Atlanticus): Ranging from 5- 150 pounds this prehistoric leviathan are a year-round species, for the most part, here in the Keys with the larger fish migration starting in late April-early May and continuing through June. This silver scaled brute with its almost steel-like mouth, razor sharp gill plates, and their acrobatic, knuckle busting runs are a true flats species that are worth their weight in gold. Sheer strength is what the big boys are all about. You can expect fights to last sometimes in excess of an hour or more but using the right amount of pressure and technique can slay even the largest of “poons” in as little as 15 minutes. Multiple fish days are not uncommon during the migration and the smaller baby tarpon that we claim as “residents” are usually willing to take flies to possibly complete your shot at a flats slam.